Burma News 1

Arakan State has been a sovereign state for more than thousand years with four dynastic eras: Dhanyawaddy (CE 370/425 – 6th century, and the original home of the Mahamuni shrine), Vesali (CE 6th – 10th century), Laymro (11th – 15th century) and Mrauk-U (CE 1430 – 1784). It lost its sovereignty with the 1784 Burman invasion. Since then, Arakan has been a part of Burma (Myanmar). Separated from Burma’s other ethnic nationalities by the Arakan Roma mountain ranges, the Arakanese people have customs and a language of their own.

 

At its peak the Arakan kingdom took tributes from as far away as Murshidabad, India, in the west, and the Mon capital of Pegu, in the east as well as much of southern Burma. Archaeological evidence suggests that it was also among the first kingdoms in the region to use currency and that it boasted a flourishing trade relationship with Portuguese, Dutch, Persian and other trading nations.

Arakan State has been a sovereign state for more than thousand years with four dynastic eras: Dhanyawaddy (CE 370/425 – 6th century, and the original home of the Mahamuni shrine), Vesali (CE 6th – 10th century), Laymro (11th – 15th century) and Mrauk-U (CE 1430 – 1784). It lost its sovereignty with the 1784 Burman invasion. Since then, Arakan has been a part of Burma (Myanmar). Separated from Burma’s other ethnic nationalities by the Arakan Roma mountain ranges, the Arakanese people have customs and a language of their own.

At its peak the Arakan kingdom took tributes from as far away as Murshidabad, India, in the west, and the Mon capital of Pegu, in the east as well as much of southern Burma. Archaeological evidence suggests that it was also among the first kingdoms in the region to use currency and that it boasted a flourishing trade relationship with Portuguese, Dutch, Persian and other trading nations.

Arakan State has been a sovereign state for more than thousand years with four dynastic eras: Dhanyawaddy (CE 370/425 – 6th century, and the original home of the Mahamuni shrine), Vesali (CE 6th – 10th century), Laymro (11th – 15th century) and Mrauk-U (CE 1430 – 1784). It lost its sovereignty with the 1784 Burman invasion. Since then, Arakan has been a part of Burma (Myanmar). Separated from Burma’s other ethnic nationalities by the Arakan Roma mountain ranges, the Arakanese people have customs and a language of their own.

At its peak the Arakan kingdom took tributes from as far away as Murshidabad, India, in the west, and the Mon capital of Pegu, in the east as well as much of southern Burma. Archaeological evidence suggests that it was also among the first kingdoms in the region to use currency and that it boasted a flourishing trade relationship with Portuguese, Dutch, Persian and other trading nations.